Showing posts with label Mary Whelan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mary Whelan. Show all posts

Saturday, August 8, 2009

Fannie Lynch Deposition 2

Here is another deposition in the Civil War pension case of Patrick Whelan. This one provides much of the same information as previous ones did.

In the matter of Mary J. Whalin wid. of Patrick Whalin “G” 90 Ill Inft for Pension
Personally came before me, a Notary Public in and for aforesaid County and State Fannie E. Lynch (Names of Witnesses, two or more.) who, being duly sworn, declares each in relation to aforesaid case, as follows: I am a cousin of above named claimant and have known her since the early part of 1867 and know she was never married prior to her marriage to above named Patrick Whalin and I was present and saw them married and remember it distinctly and know she was never previously married and I have known above named Patrick Whalin all my life and know he was never previously married and know they always lived together as husband & wife from the date of their marriage until the date of his death, and were so reputed in the community in which they resided and were never divorced from each other and she has not remarried since his death. He left only one child surviving him under 16 years of age namely Burton A. Whalin and know he was born May 22, 1890 and that both of his feet have been lost In an accident and he is still living and under the care and maintainance of above named claimant. Said Patrick Whalin did not leave any life insurance or any property of any kind or description except their household furniture which does not exceed the value of $50.00 said claimant does not own any property of any kind or description except as above mentioned and has not since the death of her husband & has no income or pecuniary interest of any kind except her own daily labor and has not since the death of her husband. This deponent has made efforts to ? a public or church record of claimants marriage to soldier, but has been informed that both the public and church records of said marriage were burned in the Chicago Fire.
Fannie E. Lynch

Thursday, May 14, 2009

The Examiner's View of the Whelan Pension Claim

Room 549, Rand-McNally Building
No. 160 Adams Street, Chicago, Ill.
May 20, 1903
The [?] of Pensions,
Washington D.C.

Sir,

I have the honor to return with my report the claim #773265 of Mary J. Whalin, which was referred to me for special examination to determine widowhood, dependence, proper name of minor, and non prior marriage of soldier.

Claimant was duly notified of the examination to be made, and of her rights and priveleges, but she did not wish to be represented by an atty, and has waived notice of any further examination deemed necessary.

This claimant is a worthy good woman of unquestioned good repute, and she is disgracefully poor, dependent beyond question. Her statement as to minors and name of her son Bertrand will, I think, satisfactorily settle that part[?].

From the witnesses whom I have seen, I have learned that soldier
became quite “cranky” during the later years of his life, and seemed to take pleasure in exaggerating his age. His hair became entirely white, and he had the appearance of being older than he really was. Peter Lynch, who is entirely reliable, an Old Lake Captain, told me after signing his deposition, of soldier’s extravagant stories about his age and said that he was younger than his sister-Mrs. Lynch, and that she & Lynch were about the same age. This would have made him about 76 or 77 if he were still living, and this corresponds with [?] estimate; She says he had the appearance of being about 40 at date of marriage.

The death cft, showing that soldier was “widowed” at date of death was unquestionably an error, as the evidence shows conclusively that the parties were living together at date of death.

Claimant was entirely correct in her statement as to the burning of the Church of Immaculate Conception in the great fire of 1871. I have had occasion to verify this repeatedly heretofore. The church records were all destroyed at that time.

I have secured the best evidence attainable, & believing it will meet the requirements of [?] of reference. I submit papers for consideration of Chief of Bd of Review.
I am very respectfully
J.H.Stibbs

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Patrick Whelan in His Own Words

This is one of my favorite documents in Patrick Whelan's pension file: Patrick's own deposition. I have retained all spelling and punctuation (or lack thereof) as it appeared in the document itself. I have deleted page numbers, form numbers and other pre-printed wording not relevant to Patrick's story.

Deposition A
Case of Patrick Whalin cft, No. 50355

On this 12th day of November, 18900, at Chicago, County of Cook State of Illinois, before me, DS McIntyre[?] a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Patrick Whalin, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 79 years of age; my post=office address is at residence is No 1059 Columbus Street Chicago Ills. I am not able to work. I have been a drayman & laborer.

I served in Co G 90th Regt Ills Infty Vols from Aug 1862 to 1865. I forget the date.
This was my only service in either the US Army or Navy.

I am now pensioned at $6.00 on account of a GSW[gun shot wound] of left leg.
I am claiming additional pension because my leg is worse. I dont know what ails it, whether it is rheumatism or what it is, but my leg gives down on me. & it pains me so much that at night I cant sleep on account of it.
The leg is no good any more.

Another thing I have pains in my breast & I get dizzy and tremble (fall) down.
I guess its my heart.

Another thing I have a rupture I guess it is. It is on my right side.
I have lost the middle finger of my left hand.
I lost it before the war.
My rupture Ive had for 10 or 12 years and may be longer.

I’ve had this heart trouble for 5 or 6 years or may be more.

I cant tell you how long Ive had rheumatism. Guess Ive had it ever since I came out of the Army I don’t know.
Id have a spell of it & then it would go away & then it would “ketch” me again. It began in my wounded leg and next in my right [?] and shoulder.
Have had it for 12 years or more.
I don’t know what brought on my rheumatism, whether it was my wound or sleeping on wet ground or not.
I am totally disabled for work.

Ques. Where have you lived since the war?
Ans. Up to the time of the big fire in 1871 I owned a house & lived in it on Sickles Street, but the fire burned me out & I lost it.
Then I lived in rented houses all In the North Side up to last March when I moved out where I am now.

Ques. What reliable men can you name who are & have been well acquainted with you?
Ans. Daniel Rock. He keeps a plumming shop on North Clark Street. (118 N Clark Directory Spl Exr) Capt John Dunn--a plummer--on N Lincoln Ave--No [number] forgotten—but I can find him. Judge ___ Kasson. Judge at Chicago Ave & Clark Street Station.
He knows me good.
Judge ___ Hammond corner of Clark & Michigan. Knows me well & he is the man who makes out my papers for me.

Ques. Do you get drunk often?
Ans. No sir. Not often. Not more than once in six months.
My sprees never last a day.
I don’t drink between times.
I haven’t drank anything for months.
My way of drinking has been that ever 6 months or so I would get on a spree and may be tight for 2 or 3 hours and then it I’d let liquor alone for months and never touch it.

Yes sir Judge Kasson sent me up once for 30 days for being drunk.

I can be present when my witnesses are seen.

I am married, have never been married but once and my wife is living. We have never been separated or divorced.
My wife’s maiden name was Mary Martin. We were married the fall of 1866 by the Priest Father Butler right here in Chicago &
There was a license & there should be a church record and a County Record.
My wife was never married before our marriage. We have one child under 16 years old-viz Bert Whalin. I cant remember his exact birthday, but he will be 12 years old this coming December.

I have understood your questions and my answers are correctly recorded.
RB Sesh[?] attest
H. C. [?]
Patrick [his X mark] Whalin Deponent.
Sworn to and submitted before me this 12th day of November 18900, and I certify that the contents were fully made known to deponent before signing.
D S McIntyre

Friday, May 1, 2009

Deposition of John Martin

Deposition B
Case of Mary J. Whalin, No. 773265

On this 19th day of May, 1903, at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Illinois, before me, J. H. Stibbs, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared John Martin, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 53 years of age, am a packer in Hardware Store, reside at 22 Locust St Chicago Ill.

I am a brother of this claimant. I came to this country in 1872.

I knew positively that my sister was not married before she left Ireland and, from what I learned of the history of her husband Patrick Whalin, after coming here, I am entirely satisfied that neither of them was married prior to their [?] marriage to each other. I know that after I came here in 1872, they lived together as man & wife until he Died, never were divorced or legally separated, & she has not remarried since his death.

She has been very poor since his death & has had no means or property of any kind & no income except from her own labor. She earns $1.00 a day as a scrub woman. The place where she lives belongs to her crippled son, and she not only cares for him, but has her old mother to support.

I am not [?] interested in this claim. The above has been read to me & is correct.

John Martin
Page 10 Deposition B

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Fannie Reardon Deposition

This is a transcription of an affidavit from the widow's pension case file of Mary J. Whalin, the widow of Patrick Whalin.

Deposition C
Case of Mary J. Whalin, No. 773265

On this 18th day of May, 1903, at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Illinois, before me, J. H. Stibbs, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Fannie Rearden, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 32 years of age, am the wife of James Rearden & reside with him at 121 East Huron St Chicago Ill.

I am a daughter of this claimant. From my earliest recollections, my Father & mother lived together as man & wife, until he died, never were divorced or legally separated and she has not remarried since his death.

I was present when my Father died. He died at their home, 1059 Columbia St. I know they were living together at that time.

My Father served in the 90th Ill . Vols. This was the only service he ever endured in the army or Navy, that I knew or heard of.

Since Father’s death, Mother has had no property of any kind, & no income from any source aside from her own labor.

The house where she lives belongs to my crippled brother. This place was paid for with the $2000 which he got from the R.R. Co. I brought the suit for him as his next nearest friend. Mother has not been able to pay the taxes, & I fear they will loose the place. The water has been shut off for two years.

From what I have known of the family history, I feel sure that neither my Father or Mother were married prior to their marriage to each other.

I have understood questions & the above which has been read to me is correct.
Fannie Reardon
Deponent.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 18th day of May 1903, and I certify that the contents were fully made known to deponent before signing.
J. H. Stibbs
Special Examiner.

Sunday, March 29, 2009

Fannie Lynch Deposition

The following is a transcription of a deposition given by Fannie Lynch for Mary Whelan, the widow of Patrick Whelan.

Deposition F
Case of Mary J. Whalin, No. 773265

On this 16th day of May, 1903, at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Ill, before me, J. H. Stibbs, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Fannie Lynch, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 45 years of age & reside with my Father Peter Lynch, at 540 Burling St. Chicago Ill.

I have known this claimant since 1867. I was a young girl then, but remember well of her coming to Chicago & coming to live with us, and I remember well of her wedding. I went to the Church & saw her married, and from what I have learned of her & her husband in later years, I feel sure that neither of them had been previously married.

They lived together as man & wife until he died. Never were divorced or legally separated & she has not remarried since his death. I was at her house just after his death & I know they were living together at the time of his death.

I remember my uncle Patrick Whalin, at the time he came from the war. He lived with us. We lived in his house, which he bought before he went to the war. I am sure he was not married before he married claimant.

The affidavit shown me B J [?] was signed by me & the statements werein made are substantively correct.

Claimant has been very poor since her husband died, has no property or income & supports herself working as a scrub woman.

I am not interested in her claim. Above has been read to me & is correct.
Fannie E. Lynch
Deponent.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 16th day of May 1903, and I certify that the contents were fully made known to deponent before signing.
J. H. Stibbs
Special Examiner.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Catherine Whelan's Deposition

This deposition was given by my great-grandmother, Catherine (Markey) Whelan. It was given in support of the claim for a widow's pension by Catherine's sister-in-law, Mary J. Whelan.

For the sake of consistency, I use the spelling "Whelan" when writing about this family. This was the spelling I have found most often in Irish records. However, Patrick's family used the spelling "Whalin" consistently in these pension documents, although not in other documents I have found. The transcription below reflects the spelling of words as given in the original documents.

Deposition D
Case of Mary J. Whalin, No. 773265

On this 18 day of May, 1903, at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Illinois, before me, J. H. Stibbs[?], a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Catherine Whalin, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 65 years of age, am the widow of Timothy Whalin and reside at 166 Chestnut in Chicago Ill.

I first knew this claimant ever since after she was married. About 5 months before she was married. She was then a young unmarried girl. I was not present at the church when they were married, but I was at the house that evening where the wedding festivities were held. My husband stood up with her when she was married. She was married in December, 35 or 36 years ago. The first I knew her husband, Patrick Whalin, was when he came from the war. He was then a single man, & had never been married, & I am sure his first marriage was to claimant. They lived together as man & wife until he died, & she has not remarried since. I know they were living together on Columbia St. at the time of his death.

She has been very poor since her husband died, has had no property & no income aside from her own labor.

I am not interested in her claim, above has been read to me & is correct.

Attest her X mark
Fannie Reardon Catherine Whalin
[?] Kenny

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Pierce Landy's Deposition

This is one of my favorite documents from the Mary J. Whalin pension file. (Click on the labels related to Patrick Whelan for additional information about this pension file.) This deposition gives several clues for me to follow up on. It also provides details of what life was like in those days and some of the challenges faced by my relatives.

Misspellings and other mistakes are transcribed as they appear in the document.

Deposition G
Case of Mary J. Whalin, No. 773265

On this 19th day of May, 1903, at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Ill, before me, J. H. Stibbs, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Pierce Landy, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am about 70 years old. I do not know my age. I reside at 181 Milton Ave Chicago Ill.

I knew this claimant before she married Pat Whalin. When I first knew her, she was a young unmarried girl. I do not believe I was at their wedding, because I was on night watch at the time, but I knew all about it, & my wife attended the wedding & saw them married.

I know they lived together from that time until he died, except for the time he was in the soldier’s House, but they were never divorced or legally separated, & she has not remarried since he died.

I knew Pat Whalin long before he went a soldiering, several years before the war, and he was then a young unmarried man. His first marriage was to this woman Mary. My first wife was his sister. When I first knew him he was a drayman here, & several years before the war he bought a lot on Siegel Street, & built a house on it, and lived there with his mother & sister, and he was living there with his mother at the time he married claimant and he afterwards lost the place on a mortgage. The first house was burned In the big fire (1871) & then[?] he borrowed money to build a two story house & that he lost. I think he was some older than me but not much.

The only property he left was the house where he lived, & I don’t know as that belonged to him. Claimant has been very poor since, and has to work as a scrub woman.

The affidavit [?] [?] B. J. [?], was signed by me.
I am not interested in this claim. The above has been read to me & is correct.
P. Landy
Deponent.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 19 day of May 1903, and I certify that the contents were fully made known to deponent before signing.
[?]
Special Examiner.

*********
Interesting points from this deposition:
1. Pierce Landy's first wife was the sister of Patrick Whelan and my ancestor, Timothy Whelan. Unfortuntely her first name is not given. I hope to find her in censuses and other records, but I'll need to be sure I find the first wife, and not a later one.

2. The mother of Patrick and Timothy Whelan lived in Chicago before Patrick went a soldiering! This is great news, since Timothy was one of my "space alien" ancestors who seemed to materialize in Chicago without any relatives. I will be trying to find out more about the mother (such as her first name) through censuses, cemetery records and other sources.

3. Patrick worked as a drayman (wagon driver) and lived on Siegel Street before the Civil War. This informtion will help me idenify him in city directories.

4. Patrick lived in a soldiers' home for a time. I will try to find out which one, and see if any records are available that might relate to Patrick.

5. Patrick owned property in Chicago. I'll want to look at any deeds, mortgages, or other records about the property.

6. Pierce Landy believes Patrick was older than him, but not by very much. Pierce wasn't sure of his own age, but believed he was about 70 years old in 1903. Therefore Patrick was probably born before 1833, at least according to Pierce.

I wll continue to post additional depositions and discoveries as I find them.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Mary J. Whalin, Widow

This is a transcription of an affidavit from the widow's pension case file of Mary J. Whalin, the widow of Patrick Whalin.

******

Deposition E
Case of Mary J Whalin, No. 773265
On this 16th day of May, 1903 at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Ill, before me, J. H. Stibbs[?], a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Peter Lynch, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says: I am 78 years of age, and reside at 540 Burling St Chicago Ill. I have known this claimant since she was a child in Ireland.
I came to this country in 1844, & was back & forth to Ireland after that. I saw claimant in Buffalo N.Y. in 1865 or 66, and when she came to Chicago. She came to live in my family. She was then a young unmarried girl.
I knew her husband, Patrick Whalin from 1857. I landed in Chicago in 1856, got acquainted with him in 1857, and knew him well from that time on. He was my wifes brother and a part of the time lived with me.
I knew positively he was not married until he married this claimant. I was at their wedding and saw them married, and I knew they lived together from that time until he died, never were divorced or legally separated. They were living together at the time of his death, and she has not remarried since. She has no property of any kind. The house in which she lives belongs to her crippled son, and she has no income, but supports herself as a scrub woman. I could not give the date of marriage, but it must have been about 1867. I knew she was here in Chicago but a short [?] when she was married. Her husband served in the 90th Ill. That was the only service he ever endured[?] in either the army or Navy that I knew or heard of. He was there[?] until he was wounded.
The affidavit B. J. [?] [?] was signed by me & the facts stated therein are correct.
I am not interested in this claim. The above has been read to me & is correct.
Peter Lynch
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 16th day of May 1903, and I certify that the contents were fully made known to deponent before signing.
[?]
Special Examiner.

*********

Patrick Whalin was my great grandfather's brother, which I discovered from documents in this pension file.

Interesting points contained in this affidavit:

The witness, Peter Lynch, was the brother-in-law of Patrick Whalin. Peter's wife (who isn't named) was the sister of Patrick.

Patrick Whalin was in Chicago by 1857.

The witness, Peter Lynch, traveled a bit. He arrived in the U.S. in 1844, arrived in Chicago in 1856, and was in Buffalo, New York in about 1865. He also indicated that he traveled back and forth between the U.S. and Ireland.

New questions based on this affidavit:

What was the name of Patrick's sister who was Peter's wife?

Why did Peter Lynch travel so much? Did he have a job that involved travel? Did he bring friends or relatives to the U.S.?

Peter Lynch knew Mary J. Whalin when she was a child in Ireland. Where in Ireland did Peter and Mary come from?

I'm hoping that other documents in this pension file will help me find the answers to these and other questions I have about Patrick Whalin and his associates.

Sunday, February 1, 2009

The Genealogy Happy Dance

My happy dances are all about reconnecting with long lost relatives. I can think of 2 major happy dance events. The most recent was connecting to cousins in Lithuania. I've written about that here.

My best previous happy dance was about connecting with relatives on my dad's side, through the Chicago Genealogical Society's "Chicago Genealogy Finder." A long lost cousin wrote a letter to me after seeing me listed with our common ancestor, Timothy Whelan. Unfortunately, the address listed was over 10 years old, and I had moved from San Diego back to the Chicago area by then. My distant cousin is a librarian, and a very resourceful person. When her letter was returned, she found my current address in more recent membership lists, and tried again. We connected, exchanged packets of information and had some nice get-togethers including her mom and my Aunt Rita. Both sides of the family knew my great aunt Frances Whelan (also known as Sister Delphine.) I also have an autograph book that belonged to my grandmother Jennie Whelan, which was signed by Jennie's half sister Mary, the great grandmother of my long lost cousin.